Top Executives of Texas Electric Grid Resign After Storm Failure

According to the local media reports, there have cases of several deaths linked to cold weather and the officials have launched a thorough investigation on what caused the electric system to shut down.

Top executives of Texas electric grid resign after storm failure
Snowplows works to clear the road during a winter storm Sunday, Feb. 14, 2021, in Oklahoma City. Sno...

The top directors of Texas’ electric power grid, who faced sharp criticism over the massive failure of the state power system, resigned on Tuesday. The board’s chairman, vice chairman, three directors, and a board nominee of the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT), all of whom live outside the state premises submitted their resignation.

The resignation of top officials was disclosed the same day after the ERCOT was hit with a proposed class lawsuit filed by the residents of Texas, who claimed that they had lost access to power and clean drinking water because of their failure to ensure that the grid was working fine despite the bad weather.

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According to the local media reports, there have cases of several deaths linked to cold weather and the officials have launched a thorough investigation on what caused the electric system to shut down. In response, Greg Abbott, the governor of the state, welcomed the resignations, saying that the ERCOT had stated that they had adequate power ahead of the storm.

According to the joint letter signed by the four directors, they maintained that the reason behind their resignation was to allow the state authorities a free hand with future and to eliminate the distractions. The statement added, “Our hearts go out to all Texans who had to go without electricity, heat, and water during frigid temperatures and continue to face the tragic consequences of this emergency.”

The former president of Consolidated Edison Co of New York, Craig Ivey, who was nominated to fill the board vacancy also withdrew before he could be seated. On the other hand, a spokesperson of the Public Utility Commission of Texas refused to comment on the flurry of resignations. Besides, as many as 3.4 million people in more than 204 counties still had issues with water.

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